Archive for October, 2011

22 October, 2011

Further Adventures, Further Proof that I Am Nocturnal

October 9: As most weekend days become in grad school, this was a beautiful day that I spent in my window seat reading.


October 10: No Parking Any Time…unless you’re a bike. I love the way my camera distorts light. Did you notice the car in the middle of the intersection? I also found a corner of the universe where everything was brown.

October 11: Owls + Peruvian gourd art = winner.

October 12: These are the same morning glories I photographed in the early morning. Despite their name, they are lovelier and more glorious in broad daylight.

October 13: Monsoon day.

October 14: the foliage has been a little bit disappointing, but I’ve also been spoiled by the Adirondacks, and the weather has been so schizophrenic lately in Boston that I understand nature’s hesitance to commit to anything dramatic at the moment. Also, another monsoon day, and another Friday spent in a library.

October 15: Boston Book Festival! 1st photo – Trinity Church, 2nd and 3rd – Old South Church, 4th – The Holy Church of Continual Caffeination (known to most as Starbucks.)

October 16: “Really, now, you named your company what?”

October 17: Because it’s important for you all to understand how much caffeine keeps me going.

October 18: Best surprise ever.

October 19: This is the Fiber Fort. It is followed by River Walk in Longwood. 🙂

October 20: Cosmetology props scare the crap out of me. Below is an instance of me creating narrative nonsensically. What do you do when you walk in out of the monsoon and there’s a row of umbrellas sitting on the floor below some perfectly good hooks? You hang yours on a hook and think about how it is a good umbrella, a warhorse among ponies, and has clearly kicked the asses of all the other umbrellas. Then you take a picture. Then you leave the umbrella on the hook, conducting a whimsical social experiment.

October 21: Sometimes I go out at night, where the lights are bright and the buildings are huge. Boylston, then Copley, although in real time these were in the opposite order. But that doesn’t matter much.

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11 October, 2011

The More We Change…

We are at that point in the semester (called midterms) where I devolve into a disheveled mess (I am currently wearing a sweatshirt in what I am affectionately thinking of as “caveman style”– one arm free, one arm in, zipper about half way up to allow this oddity of fashion to happen.) Dishes are piling, readings are spiraling, and then I find an article that’s basically like a present hidden in the pile of psychoanalytic jargon I’m reading on Edgar Huntly.

In my heart of hearts I am a classicist, and I admit this like it’s a perverse, guilty pleasure. In a conversation with a Nice Fellow, we were talking about classics departments, and how it’s like they’re segregated. There is no Romanticism department. Classicists get routinely deported to their own department though. Granted, you could argue there’s a more interdisciplinary bent to Classics departments, but the same could totally be said for any other era of history and the way we study it.

Anyway, my inner Classicist was thrilled to get to read about Sumer and Egypt briefly today, and loved and demanded to share this sentence:

Also, as in the Mesopotamian system, hieroglyphs were the tools of an elite priesthood expert in medicine and magic. The scribes guarded and boasted of their technological secrets, with a zeal that rivals even Microsoft.

Scott B. Noegel “Text, Script, and Media.”

While I think Apple would be the more appropriate comparison to secret mongering, I love the comparison for its silliness.

That is all. More photos come weekend-time.

8 October, 2011

A tremendous number of photos…

Sorry for the mega-update. Busy things for busy people…I’ve been keeping up with my photos, though.

September 25: Reading day. Made myself a pot of tea and drank out of one of my green cut-glass teacups. This was basically the most exciting thing I did all day.

September 26: Sitting around and waiting for the T to show up… 

September 27: The bounty from my adventure up to Harvard to see Ed’s miniature book. Look how wee it is! The book ends were actually stone. Ed’s book is a printing of Monty Python’s “The Galaxy Song”, and I cried a little, which may have helped me not get my ass handed to me by the Houghton book cops when they almost caught me taking these illegal pictures. Anyway, the book is beautiful, and I feel tremendously fortunate to have studied with such a cool person.

September 28: TODAY I FOUND A BUNNY AND THE WORLD WAS FULL OF GOODNESS. THAT IS ALL.

September 29: Long shadows at the Reservoir Stop.

September 30: Through ancient wrought iron (maybe? I’m not a window aficionado) windows, right before the weather threw a tantrum; litter and reflections. 

October 1: Today we went to the MFA and found my Christmas present. It’s an Akkadian (if memory serves) DRINKING CUP. Shaped like a FIST. Presumably if you get pissed off with your drinking buddy after you’ve emptied it, you can put it on and BEAT HIM UP. There is nothing about this fist-cup that isn’t AWESOME. I will let you draw your own conclusions about the cutlery dispensers, now with multi-purpose spoons.

October 2: Early morning morning glories, and one sunflower that snuck in there like a gawky cousin in from the country.

October 3: Every so often Boston College’s architecture really baffles me. Here we have a building that is basically butted up against a rock face. WHAT?

October 4: Your basic shot of the T; the front window display of a bookstore that I don’t believe actually sells books; mass-exodus at the Reservoir stop. Rush hour commuters are bizarre– a huge flock of people in high heels and suits, tramping along the train tracks, headed for the street.

October 5: Emerson area, at night.

October 6: Tree bark is cool. Just look how many colors this wants to be. 😀

October 7: Here’s a troubling juxtaposition of images– a stained glass window at St. Mary’s, and then I discovered at a street sale in Cambridge that apparently Shatner wrote a series of sci-fi books. Which Shatner? William Shatner. That Shatner. I included his charmingly normal author photo to prove it. 

October 8: Today was (supposed to be, but I am an excellent procrastinator) a reading day. Because it was lovely I went outside to read. It’s tremendously hard to convince yourself to be productive when you’re starting a three day weekend…